Tag Archives: winter walks

Belton-in-Rutland to Rutland Water

The Leighfield Way is a combined bridleway and footpath that runs north/south for 7-8 miles between the village of Belton-in-Rutland and the town of Oakham. The walk was constructed in 1994 to celebrate the centennial of the Parish Council. Continue reading Belton-in-Rutland to Rutland Water

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Stanwick Lakes to Islip

A winter walk from Stanwick Lakes

My plan today is to follow the cycle track from Stanwick Lakes to Islip. And then to continue my walk along the Nene Way, until I reach the village of Wadenhoe.

I start walking from the car park at the Visitors’ Centre.  It is a crisp and sunny winter morning, a lovely time to be walking beside the lakes.

Stanwick Lakes, Ruth Livingstone on a winter walk
Stanwick Lakes nature reserve

Continue reading Stanwick Lakes to Islip

Grafham Water walk

A good way to spend a sunny winter day: walking around Grafham Water.

Just off the A1, near Huntingdon, this manmade reservoir is owned by Anglian Water and is a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest. It is easy to get to by car and provides a pleasant walk (10 miles) around its perimeter.  Much of the walk is shared footpath and cycle track.
Continue reading Grafham Water walk

Peddars Way, Stage 4: Sedgeford to Hunstanton

Peddars Way

Peddars Way follows the line of ancient tracks and Roman roads, running  from Knettishall Heath through Norfolk until it meets the Norfolk Coast Path at the village of Holme next the Sea. It is 46 miles in length and combines with the Norfolk Coast Path to form a 93 mile long National Trail.

Fourth stage of Peddars Way

The fourth and final stage of the Peddars Way,  starts at Sedgeford and ends at Holme next the Sea, a distance of 5-6 miles. Continue reading Peddars Way, Stage 4: Sedgeford to Hunstanton

Peddars Way, Stage 3: Castle Acre to Sedgeford

Recap on Peddars Way

Peddars Way runs for 50 miles across Norfolk, from Knettishall Heath to the coast at Holme next the Sea. It comprises half of the 93 mile long Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path National Trail.

Third stage Peddars Way

The third stage of the Peddars Way, as suggested by the National Trails website, is the 14 mile hike from Castle Acre to Sedgeford (or to nearby Fring if you prefer). Continue reading Peddars Way, Stage 3: Castle Acre to Sedgeford

Peddars Way, stage 2: Watton to Castle Acre

Recap on Peddars Way

Peddars Way is just under 50 miles in length and makes up one half of the 93 mile long National Trail that includes the Norfolk Coast Path.

Second stage Peddars Way

The National Trails website suggests the second stage of the Peddars Way walk is from Little Cressingham to Castle Acre, a distance of 12 miles. Continue reading Peddars Way, stage 2: Watton to Castle Acre

Peddars Way, stage 1: Knettishall to Watton

About Peddars Way

Peddars Way is one half of the National Trail that includes the Norfolk Coast Path.

The whole trail is 93 miles long, but the Peddars Way section is, officially, just under 50 miles in length. It runs in a straight line from the southern border of Norfolk all the way to Holme on the coast, where it takes a short westward deviation along the shoreline to Hunstanton.

The path follows ancient tracks and Roman Roads, and so is steeped in history. It runs through a mixture of open agricultural countryside and forested areas. Continue reading Peddars Way, stage 1: Knettishall to Watton

Poacher Line Railway Walk: Grantham Canal

I was looking for a winter walk I could do this weekend, one that wasn’t too muddy and didn’t involve a long car journey, and I discovered a series of walks based around a local railway line.

The Poacher Line is the name given to the section of mainland railway that runs between Nottingham and Skegness.  Lincolnshire County Council has designed a  set of seven walks linking the railway stations along the route – called The Poacher Line Railway Walks.

You don’t have to be a railway enthusiast, as the walks don’t necessarily follow the railway line. The theory is that you can undertake a linear walk from one station to another, and then catch a train back to your start point. And, as everyone knows, linear walks are much more satisfying than circular walks, because they give you the feeling of being a proper traveller, as opposed to simply going for an aimless amble. Continue reading Poacher Line Railway Walk: Grantham Canal